5 Ways That Creativity Trumps Fear

It’s no secret. I was not in favor of America’s recent election of Donald Trump. There were too many examples of his misuse and abuse of power for my comfort and liking. Obviously, I’m not overjoyed about the results of the election. Will I let the fear of a President Trump control my life? Hell no!

For those of you who voted for Donald Trump. Congratulations. You got what you wished for. I hope it pans out for you in the long run. For those of us who didn’t vote for Trump. (I voted for Jill Stein.) We could spend our time worrying about what kind of problems he could create. Or we could spend our time controlling our own destiny. I’ll choose the latter.

I’m a creator, a producer. I’d rather spend my time making things than consuming things. I’d rather spend my time creating than worrying. I’ve discovered a few things along life’s road. One important discovery I’ve made is that creativity trumps fear. Why? Because it’s using your mind. It overrides fear.

1. Creativity Keeps Your Mind Busy

Fear is strongest when we let it take over our thoughts. In the past, I’ve struggled with worry and even paranoia. Read my first book, A Train Called Forgiveness to learn more about those struggles. I’ve dwelled on negative outcomes or false appearances. Being creative is an alternative to worry. We can choose where we put our mental and emotional focus.

Writing takes a creative effort. One must consider their thoughts and choose their words carefully. This takes intentional mental activity. Songwriting, photography, dancing, and other artistic forms of expression keep our minds busy. This is just one way that creativity trumps fear.

If you’re dealing with the afterthoughts of the election or any other fear, I encourage you to try something creative to override your fears.

2. Creativity Gives You Goals to Strive Toward

If you want to live a happy life. tie it to a goal, not to people or objects. – Albert Einstein

Have you ever started a creative project? Have you felt the motivation to complete the project? Your passion for creative endeavors gives you something to strive toward.

I’m not one to make long lists of goals, but I do set a few goals each year. Some of those goals are creative. Working toward these goals keeps me focused on the positive outcomes. I’ve discovered that I’m much less likely to worry when I keep busy working toward my goals.

Creativity trumps fear because my goals become more important than the people who promote fear. When I focus on my goals, I spend less time reading the media and listening to people who fear the places a Trump presidency could lead us.

Try setting and working toward some creative goals. Set a date to complete a creative project and then set specific times to work on the project.

3. Creativity Makes You More Intelligent

Studies have shown that creative people are more intelligent. And while some studies suggest that people with extremely high intelligence may have higher levels of anxiety, I’ve found that knowledge can conquer fear.

Intelligence helps one to increase their knowledge. One of the best cures for fear is to face your fear directly. I often research the things I fear. This way I can discover if there’s any basis to my fears. I also use my own creative hobbies to face fear. I’ll write a song, blog post, or even a story about something that I fear. This direct method of dealing with fear has helped me through many hard times.

If you’re afraid of something, try writing a poem or a letter addressing that fear. Do some research on the topic. Not only will you be facing your fear, you’ll also be acquiring new knowledge and gaining additional intelligence.

4. Creativity Can Bring You Monetary Rewards

Money: We all need it to survive. I’m not greedy. I don’t expect to make millions of dollars on my creative products and services. But being motivated by monetary rewards can increase one’s level of motivation.

Money can’t buy you happiness, it’s true. But having access to more money does allow us to have more access to products and services that can help distract us from fear. This is another way that creativity can indirectly lead us to overcoming fear. If I spend my time focusing on my own creative projects as a form of income, I’ll be too busy to be afraid of much of anything.

Consider using your own creativity to make some extra money. You could write and sell a book, start a blog, paint, or work at a number of other creative endeavors.

5. Creativity Is Stronger Than Fear

Here’s the bottom line. The hope and passion that stems from being creative is stronger than the emotion of fear. Being creative is very personal. When we are connected personally to something we are passionate about, we are much more likely to focus on that endeavor. Most of our fears are simply overactive thoughts. Fears often stem from things that we have no control over. We can control our creativity.

Creativity trumps fear because it allows us to make choices instead of being victims. Making our own choices gives us power. Power is an enemy of fear.

If you’re worried about Donald Trump, your bills, your relationships, or anything, I encourage you to take up something creative. I believe that the distraction of creative thinking will help you to overcome your fears. It will also help you find new and creative ways of dealing with situations that may cause fear.

What’s In Store for 2017?

I’ll be posting less often at danerickson.net in 2017. I’m focusing on my journey in minimalism and simple living at www.hipdiggs.com. I invite you to join me. Still, you can expect new posts about every three to four weeks here.

I’ll be making an effort to write posts that are slightly longer and more in-depth than my average blog post. This will be my experimental place for personal writing. I hope you’ll come back from time to time and see what’s new. I also may be adding an occasional poem, song, or short story. Anything creative is fair game because creativity trumps fear. And I’ll choose no fear in 2017 and beyond.

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